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Ships - Brown Brothers



The Versailles Treaty, an agreement at the end of the war formalizing Germany's consequences for the war obligated Germany to pay full compensation for ships lost as a result of the war. The owners of the American sailing bark Brown Brothers filed claims offering the ship was lost due to German actions during the war. Specifically, that the ship was sunk by SMS SeaGull.
Brown Brothers was built in Haugesund, Norway, in 1875. She was a bark of 870 tons, 170 feet in length and owned by the Universal Steamship Company and operated by the American Shipping Company of Brunswick, Georgia. The ship was completely renovated in 1916.
Brown Brothers, with a crew of 11, sailed from Brunswick on October 25, 1916, bound for Troon, Scotland. Her cargo consisted of pine railroad crossties. She was last reported on December 16 about 560 miles west by north of Flores, Portuguese Azores. On March 29, 1917 the sailing bark Brown Brothers was declared lost at sea.
The claim of loss due to actions of a German raider was rejected on February 2, 1927, as there was no evidence to support the claim. The logbook of SeaGull contains no reference to a sailing ship that might just be the missing vessel. Loss of Brown Brothers must, accordingly, remain among the unexplained mysteries of the deep.

RELATED TOPICS:
Compass Directions
Ship Tonnage

RELATED WEB SITES:

Disappearances and Strange Occurences It's just what the name implies.

REFERENCES:
WITHOUT A TRACE, by Charles Berlitz.
REPORTS OF INTERNATIONAL ARBITRAL AWARDS, by International Court of Justice, United Nations, 1948.
ADMINISTRATIVE DECISIONS AND OPINIONS OF A GENERAL NATURE, US Government Printing Office, 1925.

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