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Stop Immediately


Before radio was common, ships used various means of signals to communicate. Bells, flags, lights, sirens and whistles were commonly used.
Three blasts on a horn, whistle or bell signify a ship is stopping. Also three flashes of a prominently displayed light has the same meaning.
Semaphore flags are also be used to send messages. Flashing lights are used to send messages in Morse code.

Code Flags. MN. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "MN" means "stop instantly - disobey at your peril". This is one of over 650 signals sent using only two flags.


Code Flags. EC. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "EC" means "What ship are you?".


Code Flags. ID. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "ID" means "Heave to or I will fire into you".


Code Flags. RK. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "RK" means "going to stop".


Code Flags. FM. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "FM" means "Allow no communication". Meaning stop wireless communication.


Code Flags. WS. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "WS" means "communication by telegraph is stopped". Meaning wireless communication is stopped.


Code Flags. TE. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "TE" means "wait for orders". Meaning take no action until further orders are given.


Code Flags. AB. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "AB" means "abandon the vessel as fast as possible".


Code Flags. XP. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letters "XP" means "beware waterway is mined". Usually this signal is flown by ships while engaged in minesweeping operations.


Code Flags. C. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letter "C" in answer to a signal means "yes or afirmative". This confirms the signal displayed is understood and will be complied with.


Code Flags. D. International Signal Flags, prominently displaying the letter "D" in answer to a signal means "no or negative".



RELATED TOPICS:
ICOS Signals
International Signal Flags
International Morse Code
Semaphore
Wireless

REFERENCES:

THE BRITISH SIGNAL MANUAL, published by James Brown and Son, 1912.
INTERNATIONAL CODE OF SIGNALS, published by Hydrographic Office, Washington, 1909.

Last Revision: March 4, 2007.
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